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No Law and Orderattorney was ever able to prove guilt or innocence without asking a few questions...and just like them, you've got something to prove, too--in the job interview.  You can't make

Asking the right interview questions helps you prove you're the best person for the job.

your case without asking a few questions, either.

In your job interview, you've got a mission to prove to the hiring manager that: 

(a) you understand the job;

(b) you will be successful in the job; and

(c) you not only won't be a risk to his own employment, you'll make him look good.

But how?  He's got more than a few candidates telling him that they have such-and-such experience, and that they're driven, hard-working, enthusiastic, energetic, etc.  How do you stand out?

You stand out through your extensive research, preparation and questions asked during the interview.

You've got to be able to address what the company's mission, goals, and biggest problems are are and how you're the best person to deal with them.  That means doing your homework.

You're focusing less on "this is what I can do" and a little more on "this is how I can help you get where you want to go." If you do your research and change your attitude to focus on the company, you’ll be able to easily figure out which questions to ask in the interview.

And, the best way to showcase your job interview preparation and guide you to the questions to ask in the interview is through a 30/60/90-day plan.

A 30/60/90-day plan is a written outline of your tasks and goals for your first 3 months on the job.  It's just a strategic way to think about how to be successful, and you're making clear to that employer that you can be and you will be.   The more company-specific it is, the better--and that's where your research comes in.  Don't worry, it doesn't have to be perfect.  It's a tool that will facilitate your interview conversation so you can ask more questions, and you can revise it later armed with the answers you get.  The important thing is that it shows the hiring manager you've thought about how you'll accomplish important goals.  It demonstrates your communication skills, strategic thinking, dedication, and commitment.

Putting this kind of plan together takes a significant amount of work--a lot more than most candidates will do.  But that's exactly why it makes you stand out as a candidate who can prove why you are the best person for the job.